Cooking Definitions C

Food definitons C

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Chiffonade

In cooking, the French word Chiffonade, means "made of rags," obviously we don' t cook rags, but a chiffonade cut resembles what would look like shredded rags. It refers to thin strips of fresh herbs or lettuce that are stacked and rolled then sliced.

Candied / Candying

Candied / Candying is a technique where a food, usually a fruit, nut, or citrus peel, is cooked usually boiled several times, or deep fat fried then tossed or dipped in sugar syrup, icing sugar, sugar granules.

Capers

Capers are the buds of a spiny shrub that grows from Spain to China. Capers have an assertive flavor that can best be described as a combination of citrus and olive, plus an added tang that comes from the salt and vinegar of their packaging brine. While the smaller buds bring more flavor than the larger buds, both can be used interchangeably in recipes. Can also be used to describe most of the Scooby doo episodes.

Cheesecloth

A thin 100-percent-cotton cloth with either a fine or coarse weave. Cheesecloth is used in cooking to bundle up herbs, strain liquids, wrap rolled meats, AND MAKING CHEESE!! And probably a million other uses. Look for it among cooking supplies in your local grocery store.

to Cut in, Cut into

To work a solid fat, such as shortening, butter, or margarine, into dry ingredients i.e. flour. This is usually done with a pastry blender, two knives in a crisscross fashion, your fingertips, or a food processor. Smaller chilled pieces of fat work best as even the heat from your fingertips can cause the fat to melt, and ruin your desired end result.

Chop Suey

Chop Suey is a dish in American Chinese cuisine and other forms of overseas Chinese cuisine, consisting of meat and eggs, cooked quickly with vegetables such as bean sprouts, cabbage, and celery and bound in a starch-thickened sauce.

Charcuterie

Charcuterie is the branch of cooking devoted to prepared meat products, such as bacon, ham, sausage, terrines, galantines, ballotines, pâtés, and confit, primarily from pork. Charcuterie is part of the garde manger chef's repertoire. Originally intended as a way to preserve meat before the advent of refrigeration, they are prepared today for their flavours derived from the preservation processes.

Curing

Curing is any of various food preservation and flavouring processes of foods such as meat, fish and vegetables, by the addition of combinations of salt, nitrates, nitrites, or sugar, with the aim of drawing moisture out of the food by the process of osmosis. Many curing processes also involve smoking, spicing, or cooking. Dehydration was the earliest form of food curing.

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